Catching Up to Kids: How Technology is Remaking Arts Education

Catching Up to Kids: How Technology is Remaking Arts Education
Keynote Address, 76th Annual Conference for Community Arts Education
October 30 – November 1, 2013, Chicago, IL

Speaker: Don Marinelli, Co-Founder, Entertainment Technology Center , Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA

Do you often find yourself wondering how technology is transforming how students learn about, create, and share art? How it may alter longstanding traditions of teaching and learning? How it may transform established business models?

You’re not alone.

So we’ve asked Don Marinelli, co-founder of the world-renowned Entertainment Technology Center (ETC) and a former professor of drama and arts management at Carnegie Mellon University to share his thoughts and experiences from the frontier of arts and technology integration. ETC brings artists and technologists together to work on substantive, real-world projects combining the latest digital media technologies with myriad artistic, educational, and entertainment efforts. Learn how technology is changing student learning and educational paradigms—and how you can harness its potential.

Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999-2000 and 2009-10

Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999-2000 and 2009-10
On April 2, 2012, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) released a comprehensive statistical report on the conditions of K-12 arts teaching and learning, Arts Education in Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999-2000 and 2009-10.
The release event took place at the Myrtilla Miner Elementary School in Washington, D.C. Joining NCES Commissioner Jack Buckley at the event were Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Assistant Deputy Secretary for Innovation and Improvement Jim Shelton.

Following an overview of the report’s findings by Commissioner Buckley and remarks by Secretary Duncan, Assistant Deputy Secretary Shelton moderated a panel of experts from K-12 and postsecondary education to discuss key aspects of the survey’s findings.

Also featured during the one-hour event was the Miner Elementary Glee Club, under the direction of Miner Elementary music specialist Martin Ford.

Complete information on the survey report, Secretary Duncan’s remarks, and the NCES press release can be found at: http://www.ed.gov/blog/2012/04/ed-releases-new-report-on-arts-education-in-u-s-public-schools/.

Washington Watch: The Importance Of Arts Education

Washington Watch: The Importance Of Arts Education
Across the country, more and more schools faced with budget cuts and an increased focus on educational outcomes have pushed arts education to the background — in fact, off the agenda. Far too many schools don’t have arts programs at all.

Debbie Allen, Jackée, Dondre Whitfield and Brian White joined Roland Martin on Washington Watch to discuss why these programs are so important.

Joseph Epstein and Andrew Ferguson discuss the state of liberal arts education on Uncommon Knowledge

Joseph Epstein and Andrew Ferguson discuss the state of liberal arts education on Uncommon Knowledge
This week on Uncommon Knowledge, authors Joseph Epstein and Andrew Ferguson discuss where liberal arts came from and what has happened to them. Liberal arts, they say, emerged from an ancient stream of thought, learning, and belief about what is important in life, yet liberal arts degrees are not held in high regard today.

Susan Lim: Transplant cells, not organs

Susan Lim: Transplant cells, not organs
http://www.ted.com Pioneering surgeon Susan Lim performed the first liver transplant in Asia. But a moral concern with transplants (where do donor livers come from …) led her to look further, and to ask: Could we be transplanting cells, not whole organs? At the INK Conference, she talks through her new research, discovering healing cells in some surprising places.

Arts Summit: “Arts Education” (Howard Gardner)

Arts Summit: “Arts Education” (Howard Gardner)
http://www.kennedy-center.org/programs/specialevents/summit/

The Kennedy Center, in association with the Aspen Institute, presents the 2015 Aspen Institute/Kennedy Center Arts Summit. Drawing on the Kennedy Center’s national artistic prominence and the Aspen Institute’s thought leadership, this Summit identifies how the arts should move forward in addressing the issues that we face in our society today.

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